Thursday , April 15 2021

Using the Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers detect X-ray emissions from Uranus



One theory is that the Sun is behind the emission of X-rays, while another theory suggests that the rings cause them.

Using the Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers detect X-ray emissions from Uranus

Uranus is the seventh planet from the Sun and revolves around it, making it different from all the other planets in the solar system. Credit picture: NASA

Astronomers have found that Uranus may emit X-rays using the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Chandra X-ray Observatory. This new information could help scientists learn more about the seventh planet from the Sun and the coldest planet in our solar system. The observations studied by the researchers were received in 2002 and after 2017 by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. According to NASA Press release, the researchers clearly identified the presence of X-rays in the 2002 observation. Later in 201, a possible X-ray burst was identified.

Using the Chandra Xray Observatory, astronomers detect Xray emissions from Uranus

Uranus is the seventh planet from the Sun and revolves around it, making it different from all the other planets in the solar system. Credit picture: NASA

The magnetic field and the axis of rotation of the ice planet make it an interesting subject for the study of X-ray observation. Uranus is the only planet in our solar system that revolves around it, making it very different from all our other planets. .

According to astronomers, the reason behind the emission of X-rays from Uranus could be the Sun, as previously observed in the cases of Jupiter and Saturn. However, astronomers who participated in the study, published in Journal of Geophysical Research, they also found evidence that the rings of Uranus could produce these X-rays themselves. This possibility has been suggested keeping in mind that Saturn’s rings also scatter X-rays.

Another possible source of X-rays on the planet could be auras, which are polar lights caused by electrons traveling through the Earth’s magnetic field. They are also found on Jupiter. Although the cause of the aura in Uranus is not yet clear, recent observations may help astronomers understand the reason behind this phenomenon.


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