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Americans eat too much processed meat and need a DIFFERENT inflow of fish



Americans eat too much processed meat and need to DIP on fish intake to prevent heart disease, obesity and cancers,

  • Processed meat consumption increased slightly from 182 grams per week in 1999 to 187 grams per week in 2016
  • A diet high in meats, such as sausages, warm dogs and lunch meals, is known to cause cardiovascular disease, obesity and even some cancers
  • Consumption of fish and seafood remained stable, between 115 and 116 grams per week, half of the recommended levels
  • Seafood is known for low fat and cholesterol, high in protein and rich in omega-3 fatty acids

Americans still eat too much processed meat and very few fish, according to a new study.

Researchers say that, similar to the 20 years, the majority of US adults could go through the equivalent of about a pack of deli ham every week.

Meanwhile, they eat only half the fish and shellfish, as recommended by the federal guidelines.

A diet with a high content of processed meat, including sausages, hot dogs and meat of vegetables, has long been known to cause cardiovascular disease, obesity and even certain cancers.

The team, from Tufts University in Boston, Massachusetts, says the conclusions show that health interventions – such as excise duties and health warnings – may be necessary to reduce the levels of processed meat consumption .

A new study by Tufts University in Boston, Massachusetts, found that US adults consume about 187 grams of unprocessed meat per week, despite the association with cancer and not so much the image file,

A new study by Tufts University in Boston, Massachusetts, found that US adults consume about 187 grams of unprocessed meat per week, despite the association with cancer and not so much the image file,

For the study, published in the Journal of the Nutrition and Dietetics Academy, the team examines about 44,000 adults from the National Health and Nutrition Survey.

They examined how much processed meat, raw red meat, poultry, fish and shellfish ate the last almost two decades from 1999 to 2016.

Processed red meat consumption was little changed, slightly increasing from 182 grams per week to 187 grams per week.

The most processed meat consumed was a meal of meat, followed by sausages, hot dogs, ham and bacon.

Several studies have linked excessive consumption of processed meat to diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease and even cancer.

In fact, the International Cancer Research Organization classified processed meat as "carcinogenic to humans" in 2015.

"I am personally disappointed, despite the strong evidence linking the processed meat to the risk of cancer, that we did not see a [decrease], said Professor Dr. Fang Fang Zhang, Associate Professor at Tufts University, at DailyMail.com.

"Ideal consumption will be zero, as set out in the guidelines for cancer prevention. Avoid or limit red meat. "

Meanwhile, fish and seafood consumption remained stable, with an almost significant increase from 115 grams per week in 1999 compared to 116 grams per week.

This is the equivalent of having about four ounces of tuna a week.

More than double this amount is recommended in accordance with the American 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines. Less than 15% meet the instructions.

Researchers believe that US adults can consume small quantities of fish and shellfish because of their high retail price or without knowing their health benefits.

Seafood is known for low fat and cholesterol, high in protein and rich in omega-3 fatty acids.

For future research, the group wants to look at the effectiveness of potential public health interventions as well as policies such as excise duty on red meat or health warnings.

"We hope to receive a stronger message about nutritional recommendations out there and we hope the evidence we have can play a part in it," Dr Zhang said.


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