Thursday , January 28 2021

The H7N9 virus can spread with droplets




A patient infected with avian influenza H7N9 was treated last year to a hospital in Wuhan, China.
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A patient infected with avian influenza H7N9 was treated last year to a hospital in Wuhan, China.
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Professor Hegang Yuyu, Professor of the Institute of Medical Sciences, Tokyo University. Online photo
Professor Hegang Yuyu, Professor of the Institute of Medical Sciences, Tokyo University. Online photo

H7N9 avian influenza virus. Online photo
H7N9 avian influenza virus. Online photo

Newspaper

Research by the research team at the Tokyo University in Japan confirmed for the first time that the H7N9 bird flu virus can spread through the cornice. Experts responsible for the study worry that the virus has mutated into a new type of influenza virus that could cause a global outbreak and call for increased warning.

The research team headed by Professor Hegang Yoshihiro of the Tokyo University's Medical Sciences Institute, after infecting a ferret with the H7N9 avian influenza virus, found that the virus could mix in the droplet droplets and spread outside the body. In order not to infect other healthy ferrets, the researchers split the two ferrets from the cage about 7 cm. After four days, healthy ferrets were infected and even detected at a distance of 80 cm. Virus.
Prior to this, when infected avian influenza virus mammals almost did not fully incorporate droplet contamination. This is the first time the strain of avian influenza virus can spread through the droplets. Researchers say that if avian influenza virus genes are mutated repeatedly, a new type of influenza virus will be produced that will become more prone to human infection.
Professor He Gang has warned that H7N9 bird flu is likely to cause a global epidemic and it is necessary to increase vigilance and require further research. The H7N9 avian influenza virus confirmed the world's first human infection case in China in 2013. So far, more than 1,500 people have been infected in areas based on China, mainly from birds to humans.
Hegang Yiyu specializes in influenza virus and Ebola virus research and is the winner of the Robert Coho German Medical Award. He copied the Spanish influenza virus in 1918 to cause panic and then made a more powerful virus from the H1N1 flu that erupted in 2009, which was criticized by the scientific community.
In addition, Hong Kong's Secretary of Food and Health, Chan Chan-chu, stressed that the risk of bird flu has always been. Bailiang, director of the Center for Infectious and Infectious Diseases at the University of Hong Kong, said that dozens of virus samples were extremely pathogenic in human H7N9 infection in mainland China, causing serious infections in humans or birds. However, he pointed out that spreading avian influenza via droplets is not new information. At this stage, the pandemic risk assessment of the avian influenza virus is still low.


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