Sunday , January 17 2021

The successes and failures of the ODI Black Caps series draw Pakistan



Three down, 11 to go.

Black Caps coach Gary Stead learned he could rain in the desert and also discovered more about his one-day international cultivation on a 1-1 draw with Pakistan.

There are now three tests in the United Arab Emirates, starting Friday, before 11 more ODI in the summer summer against Sri Lanka, India and Bangladesh, so the coach and selector Gavin Larsen will have the 15 World Cup names.

Having spotted the "three or four" spots that still go up in his 15th cup, we look at what Stead would like and was not so impressed by ODI before the rain of Dubai that destroyed a pretty relaxed ruler.

READ MORE:
* Scoreboard: Black Caps v Pakistan
* Rain in the desert is washed by the ODI
* Ferguson secures the cup ticket
* Hadlee's world record was revived

ISH SODHI

Legspinner Ish Sodhi took two wickets in 24 overs at 5.25 in three ODI matches against Pakistan.

YASIR NISAR / PHOTOSPORT

Legspinner Ish Sodhi took two wickets in 24 overs at 5.25 in three ODI matches against Pakistan.

Stead was originally hoping to put the legs of Sodhi and Astle in collaboration with the ODIs before the Astle tour that ended shortly before kicking off due to the knee problem.

He gave Sodhi the jump in one of the most interesting World Cup competitions between the two legspinners, but for whatever reason he could not take advantage of his chance and left Astle still very likely if he can bounce home.

Two wickets of 24 overs with an average of 64 and an economic rate of 5.25 did not make much reading about Sodhi. It did not fall terribly, but against Shadab Khan there was no contest: the Pakistani shooter took an impressive 5-63 out of 20 overs.

One theory is that the shuffled surfaces do not fit into the Sodhi style, but what happened in its test site will now be under control.

The Abu Dhabi Stadium for the first test of Friday will be a central element of their choices, with two spinners looking confident. One of Will Somerville, Ajaz Patel and Sodhi can lose and after the games of the latter he can look over his shoulder.

COLIN MUNRO

Player of the Shaheen Afridi series strikes, bowling Colin Munro for zero to leave the ODI set of black hat opener on a total of 42 tracks.

FRANCOIS NEL / GETTY IMAGES

Player of the Shaheen Afridi series strikes, bowling Colin Munro for zero to leave the ODI set of black hat opener on a total of 42 tracks.

Once again the change from Twenty20 to ODI cricket turned out to be disturbing to Munro just as Stead needed him to show he could not stay out of the World Cup team.

In his last eight ODIs with England (at home) and Pakistan (away), Munro scored 98 runs at 12.25 – half of them in the Wellington game in March.

Again the shooting option was the theme, especially in the game two after hitting Shaheen Afridi for six who tried to repeat and caught. Then, in the game, three Afridi beat him only for pace, his angular tradition in a good length by easily confronting the distance between the two groups of Munro, half a move.

Munro will find it hard to get out of Cup 15 as his middle rhythm can do a job for Kane Williamson and has been well on top with Martin Guptill.

But in the summer of the house, he will see the fan put into Munro on the 11th ODI to satisfy Stead that he is not just a T20 player and he can raise for the big chance at 50-over cricket.

KANE WILLIAMSON

Captain Kane Williamson lost the game three due to the stalk, but coach Gary Stead is sure to play the test.

ANDREW CORNAGA / PHOTOSPORT

Captain Kane Williamson lost the game three due to the stalk, but coach Gary Stead is sure to play the test.

It did not go much for the ODI governor: he caught a badly drawn pull in the first game, then ran in the third ball of the third off the attacker in the game two, and suffered a lumbar pressure.

Stead said that if the World Champion had finished, Williamson would play and with a 48-hour backup in the game three did not want to risk injury for the tests.

Four years ago in the UAE, Williamson scored 69 goals in his first four test qualifying matches against Pakistan before defeating 192 in the ritual victorious Sharjah test with Brendon McCullum.

The quick hit of 60 in the final T20 was Williamson vintage and you could argue that the master is due. New Zealand definitely needs him and Ross Taylor to go big with Pakistan's swirling strollers and eternal queries about Black Caps against slow bowling in Asia.

LOCKIE FERGUSON

The New Zealand man of the series was fast-bladed Lockie Ferguson who took 11 wickets on an average of 12.8 and showed his readiness for the World Cup selection.

YASIR NISAR / PHOTOSPORT

The New Zealand man of the series was fast-bladed Lockie Ferguson who took 11 wickets on an average of 12.8 and showed his readiness for the World Cup selection.

The indisputable ODI success story and a big show ticket to the UK next May must definitely be with Tim Southee, Trent Boult, Matt Henry and possibly another swimmer.

Fast, aggressive and a viable choice to die, Ferguson pulled all the boxes and was named "excellent" by his coach, a point of difference in any lineup with his rhythm and the fear factor for the batsmen.

Eleven wickets at 12.81 talked about a story as it ended in a hurry with a better 5-45 career having got a better haul of three wickets in the previous 18 ODIs.

Otherwise, the rhythm bowling was a mixed bag with Boult fading after his amazing hat on the first game. Maybe it took running after the long break, and the lack of swing would not have helped, but it was still worrying to see him accept 80.

Henry was an interesting choice for Southee and it was convenient without causing a massacre at the top. This fight will be interesting this summer with Henry in the form of his life in England and more than a wicket-taking threat in front of the home ground.

COLIN DE GRANDHOMME

Allinunder Colin de Grandhomme was comfortable with the ball, just going four up and taking three wickets in the ODI range, but he needs running.

FRANCOIS NEL / GETTY IMAGES

Allinunder Colin de Grandhomme was comfortable with the ball, just going four up and taking three wickets in the ODI range, but he needs running.

It is convenient for the ball (3-89 out of 22, economy a little over four), but within a disturbing drought course, which should be tackled in the tests as it gets the key.

In six appearances in T20 and ODI in the UAE, de Grandhomme's rankings are 1, 6, 4, 6, 0 and 3. There is some ugly outflows that can not be held against him but the hitter needs to return to his form from his summer home, especially a striking second and decisive test against England.

The allrounder spot remains intrigiung by the selection of the World Cup, with de Grandhomme looking for a safe bet and the question that remains if Stead goes with five quicks or two bowling allrounders in his team.

Corey Anderson must return to the bowling fast and be able to back up while Jimmy Neesham continues to put a decisive affair on Wellington's home cricket but needs to force his way into the black shirt again this summer for to be a realistic opportunity for the cup.


Source link