Monday , January 25 2021

Motor neuron sufferers and supporters go to D & # 39; Feet Disease



Patients and supporters of motor neuron disease walked from the Palmerston North Fire Station to the square to support people with the disease.

MURRAY WILSON / STUFF

Patients and supporters of motor neuron disease walked from the Palmerston North Fire Station to the square to support people with the disease.

A short walk may feel like a marathon for those suffering from motor neurone disease so that people hit the streets to show their support.

A nationwide motor neuron disease Walk 2 D Peet was held on Sunday, the day of sensitization for muscle disease that is wasting people out of their movement and speech and is ultimately fatal.

Supporters and sufferers of the disease walked from the fire station in North Palmerston on the square and back to raise awareness and money for research to fund a cure.

Many were dressed in blue clothes as they turned the square, followed by a fire truck.

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Kylie Martin, 31, from Palmerston North, was diagnosed about 10 years ago and began to get worse about five years ago.

She said she was running in her family – her father, grandfather, uncle and uncle had all died of motor neurone disease.

"I'm obviously worried about the next generation," Martin said of her four children.

He said he could not stand for long periods and he easily tired.

"Especially when trying to run a household with children is extremely tiring."

Marilyn Merriman of Palmerston North, 70, learned that a year ago he had a motor neuron disease.

It now takes a step to pass, but her husband, Ross, pushed her into a wheelchair for Sunday's walk.

People walked to Palmerston North on Sunday for Walking Disease Neuroscience Peet.

MURRAY WILSON / STUFF

People walked to Palmerston North on Sunday for Walking Disease Neuroscience Peet.

"I was so anxious," said Merriman. "We went for walks for an hour, now we can not do that."

He said it was good to meet other people who had the same problem.

More than 3,000 people in New Zealand have motor neuron diseases and more than 100 sufferers die each year.

"With more people diagnosed each year in New Zealand we want to be able to reach these impacts and provide the best support for people living with motor neuron disease and their families," said Carl Sunderland, Director General of New Zealand.

Half of the funds gathered across the country were intended to provide support to people with this disease and the other half went to research for treatment.


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