Tuesday , November 24 2020

Coffee is so good for you who can limit the risk of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's – BGR



We as a person have to live with many unfortunate realities, including the fact that many of the things we love end up being bad for us. We all know so far that if we get very tasty flavors, we will arrive at an early tomb, but in recent years it is becoming increasingly clear that coffee, a well-known representative of millions and millions of people, is actually very good for you.

Recent studies have shown that having a regular coffee drinker can reduce the risk of all sorts of conditions, including heart attack and stroke. Now a new research effort reveals that dark roasted coffee is especially good at avoiding some unpleasant conditions in the brain, including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease.

The study, which focused on a specific group of compounds called phenyindans, highlights the benefits of determining the type of baking that you go with your breakfast. Dark roast, even in the form of decaffeinated form, is packed with compounds, which are thought to inhibit the production of a type of protein associated with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.

"Caffeine and caffeine dark roasted each had identical forces in our initial experimental trials," said Dr. Ross Mancini, head of the study. "So we noticed early that the protective effect could not be due to caffeine."

This is great news for potential coffee enthusiasts who would like to reap the benefits of drinking, but they do not like the feelings that cause stress. However, if you love your abundant caffeine preparation, just as it is, you will still have many benefits, even if you do not define the dark roast. The idea is that the roasting process of coffee is what creates the joints, meaning that the longer the beans are cooked, the more beneficial compounds find their way into the resulting beverage.

So if you're a smoker, you can feel even better about your habit, and if you're not, well, maybe it's time to give it another shot.


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